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We’ve created this guide of nature-based solutions and included case studies of successful projects from across the country to help communities learn more and identify which nature-based solutions might work for them.

Nature offers a powerful set of tools for addressing hazards like flooding and erosion.

Recent studies demonstrate that green spaces in urban areas may actually decrease violent and property crimes in neighborhoods.

One study comparing 98 apartment buildings in an inner-city neighborhood indicated that residents with higher amounts of nearby nature reported fewer violent and minor crimes, and fewer incivilities.

A related study in Philadelphia found study participants who walked by a ‘greened’ vacant lot showed decreased heart rate, a sign of reduced stress, compared to a control group.

The trees and vegetation in natural areas and green spaces improve water quality and air quality, particularly in larger cities, which has been connected to lower rates of asthma and wheezing in urban populations.

For example, wetlands, floodplains, forests, prairies and marshes improve water quality by filtering pollutants and sediment from water.

Some speed reading technologies claim to offer an additional boost by eliminating the need to make eye movements by presenting words rapidly in the center of a computer screen or mobile device, with each new word replacing the previous word.'Examining decades' worth of research on the science of reading, a team of psychological scientists finds little evidence to support speed reading as a shortcut to understanding and remembering large volumes of written content in a short period of time,' they said.'Speed reading training courses have been around for decades, and there has been a recent surge in the number of speed reading technologies that have been introduced to the consumer market,' said Elizabeth Schotter, a psychological scientist at the University of California, San Diego and one of the authors of the report.'We wanted to take a close look at the science behind reading to help people make informed decisions about whether to believe the claims put forth by companies promoting speed reading technologies and training courses.'The report, published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, shows that that there are no magic shortcuts when it comes to reading more quickly while still fully understanding what we've read.'The available scientific evidence demonstrates that there is a trade-off between speed and accuracy — as readers spend less time on the material, they necessarily will have a poorer understanding of it,' explains Schotter.

Some speed reading technologies claim to offer an additional boost by eliminating the need to make eye movements by presenting words rapidly in the center of a computer screen or mobile device, with each new word replacing the previous word.

Greater exposure to writing in all its different forms provides us with a larger and richer vocabulary, as well as the contextual experience that can help us anticipate upcoming words and make inferences regarding the meaning of words or phrases we don't immediately recognize.

In fact, data suggest that the most effective 'speed readers' are actually effective skimmers who already have considerable familiarity with the topic at hand and are thus able to pick out key points quickly.

The percentage of green space within a two-mile radius of a person’s home has been associated with the percentage of residents reporting good health, particularly among homemakers, the elderly, and those with lower socioeconomic status—groups that are typically less likely to get sufficient physical activity.

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