Dating the books of the bible

The most obvious conclusion would be that the Book of Daniel was written at the time of the profanation of the Temple by Antiochus IV, during the Maccabean revolt which that sacrilege provoked.That would explain why the author is not very precise about sixth century events, why he is so precise about the time of Antiochus, and why he was never counted among the prophets.Furthermore he makes no mention of the fact that it was the Edict of Cyrus of 538 BCE.which finally allowed the Hebrews to return to Israel.The second part, which is mostly prose and usually speaks of Jeremiah in the third person, probably owes its composition to Baruch, the scribe who, according to chapter 36, wrote the prophecies against Israel and Judah and all the nations from Jeremiah’s dictation.The prophecies against foreign nations may derive in part from Jeremiah; the appendix was largely taken from 2 Kings –.Thirdly, the whole genre of Apocalyptic literature which Daniel represents only developed during the period of crisis and persecution under Antiochus.

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One 20th-century German biblical scholar, Wilhelm Rudolph, has attempted to arrange the chapters of the book according to certain chronological details.…

An unusual feature of this book is the “confessions” of Jeremiah, a group of individual laments reflecting the personal struggles precipitated by the prophet’s role as the spokesman of a message so unpopular that it evoked imprisonments and threats to his life.

These confessions make the personal history of Jeremiah more accessible than that of any other Old Testament prophet.

However, several internal inconsistencies give rise to certain questions and we are forced to ask whether these dates can be taken as the date of composition. The book of Daniel portrays him as the Babylonian king in the first year of whose reign Daniel has his dream of the four great beasts which come up out of the sea.

(7:1-14) Belshazzar was said to have been slain after he saw the writing on the wall, at which time Darius the Mede supposedly took over the Babylonian kingdom () Actually Belshazzar was the son of the Babylonian king, Nabonidus, and he ruled in place of his father when Nabonidus went to live in Teima in the Arabian desert for eight years (c.

The major parts of the book are usually delineated as follows: prophecies against Judah and Jerusalem (chapters 1–25), narratives about Jeremiah (chapters 26–45), prophecies against foreign nations (chapters 46–51), and a historical appendix (chapter 52).

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